Music Notes 

January 16, 2017

Seattle Festival Orchestra January 22

Seattle Festival Orchestra presents selections from Mussorgsky, Tchaikovsky, and Kalinnikov 3 pm this Sunday, January 22, in Plymouth Sanctuary.

MUSSORGSKY: Khovantchina: Introduction, Dawn on the Moskva River; TCHAIKOVSKY: Sleeping Beauty: Suite op.66a; KALINNIKOV: Symphony No. 1, G minor

In this all-Russian program Seattle Festival Orchestra explores the timeless works of Mussorgsky and Tchaikovsky as well as the seldom-heard Symphony No. 1 in G minor by Kalinnikov. Mussorgsky left behind only a handful of completed works when he died in 1881. The Introduction to his opera Khovantchina was the only part he finished (although Rimsky-Korsakov had to do the orchestration) but it is a beautiful work that stands well on its own.

Tchaikovsky remains one of the finest composers of ballet music and his suite from Sleeping Beauty brings this fairy tale to life. Enthusiasts of Tchaikovsky will surely enjoy Vassili Kalinnikov’s powerful Symphony No. 1. Kalinnikov’s life was cut short by illness bringing a promising composer’s life to an untimely close. Despite this, his First Symphony is a masterpiece outlining his immense talent.

Tickets and more information here.  

Choral Arts Northwest concert commemorates World War I Centennial

Friday, March 24, more than three years of work culminates in the premiere of a concert-length oratorio for choir with vocal soloists and chamber orchestra composed by CANW’s 2016-17 Composer-in-Residence, John Muehleisen.

But Who Shall Return Us Our Children: A Kipling Passion commemorates the centennial of World War I. Focusing on the historical account of Lieutenant John Kipling’s 1918 death at the Battle of Loos, and its impact on his famous parents, Rudyard and Carrie Kipling, this story represents that of countless families during World War I—and in all wars before or since. The narrative touches on a issues relevant to our own time, including consequences of unbridled nationalism and challenges faced by veterans when they return home.

Featuring nationally renowned soloists Charles Robert Stephens (bass) as Rudyard Kipling, Kim Giordano (soprano) as his wife Carrie and Eric Neuville (tenor) as their son John, Muehleisen uses the passion form to explore how we may find healing in the face of unspeakable tragedy. The work seeks to honor and bring voice to the often-silent suffering of our veterans and their families.

Choral Arts NW has generously offered Plymouth congregation a season-long 20% coupon code when purchasing online: PLYMOUTHUCC. Discount tickets are available to Plymouth members at ChoralArtsNW.org, day of the concert and at the church office. Go to Plymouth Church Facebook to hear an audio clip from a recent rehearsal!

Seattle Festival Orchestra presents selections from Mussorgsky, Tchaikovsky, and Kalinnikov 3 pm this Sunday, January 22, in Plymouth Sanctuary.MUSSORGSKY: Khovantchina: Introduction, Dawn on the Moskva River; TCHAIKOVSKY: Sleeping Beauty: Suite op.66a; KALINNIKOV: Symphony No. 1, G minorIn this all-Russian program Seattle Festival Orchestra explores the timeless works of Mussorgsky and Tchaikovsky as well as the seldom-heard Symphony No. 1 in G minor by Kalinnikov. Mussorgsky left behind only a handful of completed works when he died in 1881. The Introduction to his opera Khovantchina was the only part he finished (although Rimsky-Korsakov had to do the orchestration) but it is a beautiful work that stands well on its own. Tchaikovsky remains one of the finest composers of ballet music and his suite from Sleeping Beauty brings this fairy tale to life. Enthusiasts of Tchaikovsky will surely enjoy Vassili Kalinnikov’s powerful Symphony No. 1. Kalinnikov’s life was cut short by illness bringing a promising composer’s life to an untimely close. Despite this, his First Symphony is a masterpiece outlining his immense talent.Tickets and more information at seattlefestivalorchestra.org.  

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